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ESS, Event Share Specification, is currently in it's 0.91 version and will be where it will stay until something major is needed for future usage. It is drafted format, it was sampled for usage inside an RSS container element. We took this approach because at the time, RSS was the most popular source of syndication, but wouldn't always be. Now that Atom is gaining popularity, I have decided to add an appedix to the specification with a sample usage of ESS inside an Atom container element. The sample below will be attached to the specification.
<?xml version="1.0"?>
<feed 
     version="0.3" 
     xmlns="http://purl.org/atom/ns#" 
     xmlns:event="http://esfstandard.org/specification/2004/ess" 
     event:version="0.91">
     <title>Kansas City .NET User Group Schedule</title>
     <link 
          rel="alternate" 
          type="text/html" 
          href="http://dotnetsig.org/" />
     <modified>2004-10-13T16:30:00Z</modified>
     <author>
          <name>Jeff Julian</name>
     </author>
     <entry event:scope="public">
          <title>Hacked! How evil people attack ASP.NET web sites--and what you can do about it.</title>
          <link 
               rel="alternate" 
               type="text/html" 
               href="http://dotnetsig.org/meeting.htm"/>
          <id>http://dotnetsig.org/2004/10/INETAProsise</id>
          <issued>2004-10-13T16:30:00Z</issued>
          <modified>2004-10-13T16:30:00Z</modified>
          <content type="text/html" mode="escaped">
               Security is a big deal in all network applications, but it's even more important 
               in applications deployed on the Web. Every day ASP.NET developers unwittingly 
               deploy sites that are vulnerable to SQL injection attacks, cross-site scripting 
               attacks, hidden-field tampering attacks, and other hacks. In a fun-filled and 
               action-packed evening, Jeff demonstrates the most common and debilitating types 
               of attacks used against ASP.NET Web sites, and provides step-by step 
               instructions on how to code against them. Be warned: what you see here might 
               scare you!
          </content>
          <event:starts>Wed, 28 Oct 2004 00:00:00 GMT</event:starts> 
          <event:ends>Wed, 28 Oct 2004 01:00:00 GMT</event:ends> 
          <event:location> 
              <event:address sequence="1">7950College Blvd.</event:address> 
              <event:city>Overland Park</event:city> 
              <event:region>KS</event:region> 
              <event:country>USA</event:country> 
              <event:postalCode>66210</event:postalCode> 
          </event:location> 
          <event:referenceUrl>http://www.dotnetsig.org/meeting.htm</event:referenceUrl> 
          <event:audience>Local .NET Developers</event:audience> 
          <event:speaker>Jeff Prosise</event:speaker> 
          <event:eventID>2004-10-INETAProsise</event:eventID> 
          <event:directionUrl>http://dotnetsig.org/map.htm</event:directionUrl> 
          <event:registrationUrl>http://dotnetsig.org/register.asp</event:registrationUrl> 
          <event:type>event/group/meeting</event:type> 
     </entry>
</feed>
In fact, if you have a item-based syndication format, ESS will most likely fit perfectly.
Posted on Friday, October 22, 2004 8:37 PM | Back to top


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